Interview with Navy sailor suffering after Fukushima radiation exposure

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The Truth Hurts

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Emotional interview with Navy sailor suffering after Fukushima exposure: Others with same symptoms “told to be quiet… nobody’s heard from them” — Health is worsening, worried I’m going to die — Can’t really use legs or arms, hands ‘barely functional’ — Rashes all over body, spasms, shaking — Doctors tell us “it’s all psychological” (AUDIO) http://enenews.com/emotional-interview-navy-sailor-suffering-serious-illness-after-fukushima-exposure-others-same-symptoms-told-be-quiet-nobodys-heard-worry-about-dying-health-keeps-worsening-really-legs-arms-h?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+ENENews+%28Energy+News%29

Interview with Navy Lt. Steve Simmons who served on the USS Ronald Reagan for 3/11 relief mission
, Nuclear Hotseat hosted by Libbe HaLevy, July 8, 2014 (emphasis added):

  • 21:30 in — November 2011 I noticed something was wrong… The black-out was the first thing… I started dealing with gastrointestinal issues, at first I thought I was coming down with a stomach bug… Fevers as high as 102.9°F… January 2012 was the first time I was hospitalized… [They] sent me home with a sinus infection. Three days later I was readmitted to…

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Taro Aizu’s Fukushima Gogyoshi

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In honor of the continuing victims of the Japanese national tragedy in Fukushima (3/11/11), and on the occasion of National Poetry Month, here is a moving and sobering poem about those whose lives continue to erode daily from the effects of radioactive pollution.

Videos from Gogyoshi Art Project: My Hometown Fukushima
Read more about the Gogyoshi, a poetic form invented by Taro Aizu.

We eat our bagel and cream cheese

Tsunami

In Honor of the Third Anniversary of the monstrous tsunami that hit Fukushima Prefecture in Japan on March 11, 2011, I am re-posting this poem, which I wrote as soon as I heard the news. The tsunami leaves a lasting legacy of loss and radioactive pollution from the Fukushima Daiichi power plant that was crippled by the enormous wave. This was my very first post on WriteWireless. Heartfelt love and prayers of comfort go out to all of the people affected by this catastophe.
 

We eat our bagel and cream cheese

We eat our bagel and cream cheese, thinking mildly…

From above, it looks like a Godzilla movie–the tidal wave filmed in miniature, the

…about carbs and fat intake…

cars being swept along under overpasses,

…and sip our freshly brewed coffee…

boats crashing into city bridges,

…wondering what we’ll write about today…

cars parked in lots swept along, buoyant like mini marshmallows in hot chocolate or like drowning ants

….or whom we can network with…

huge mases of splintered buildings, cars, people;

… What time is our interview?…

a burning oil refinery.

… What picture should we post on LinkedIn?…

It isn’t until the next day

… Should we look business-like or should we be casual?…

that the close-ups on You Tube are available

“What time should we work out today?…

and we see the huge buildings and cargo ships floating down the street

… Oh my God!…

and coming to rest with the cars and uprooted houses in heaps against the few structures that have stood their ground.

That night, we watch the nuclear plants begin to break down and release their poison into the air, land, and sea. The videos on Yahoo show clip after clip of people walking, dazed, past a car on top of a house, a huge ship standing up on land, nose poised over the water. Street after street of soggy rubble, not a house standing. Hiroshima and Nagasaki come to mind. The devastation is similar, especially on a human level.

On day 3, we see stacks of photos online: the land is reduced to a splintered wasteland. Brothers and sisters, lost, bereft, sift through mud to find a connection to a life so newly and brutally ripped from them. A grandmother finds a pillow, a mother finds a photograph, a boy finds a soiled school award. A grandfather wanders the wet ruins of his ancestral neighborhood. A father weeps, the reality of the catastrophe dawning on him. How many of his relatives were among the 10,000-plus who perished? Will he ever have dinner with his family again?

A hand pokes out of the rubble, motionlessly grasping for something that is gone.

Nobody in Hollywood or Toho wrote this script.

How can we ever know what it feels like?

PBS Newshour: Fukushima Nuclear Crisis Continues to Unfold

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PBS NewsHour

Published on 28 Feb 2014

Description:

The site of the Fukushima nuclear disaster in Japan remains a post-apocalyptic landscape of abandoned towns, frozen in time. Science correspondent Miles O’Brien got a rare tour inside the plant, where three nuclear reactors melted down after the earthquake and tsunami in 2011, to learn more about the long-term solutions for stemming the radioactive contamination.

PBS special on Fukushima starts tonight with rare look inside plant — Correspondent loses arm after filming in Japan — “Amputated after an apparently minor injury”

http://enenews.com/pbs-special-on-fukushima-starts-tonight-with-rare-look-inside-plant-correspondent-loses-arm-soon-after-leaving-japan-amputated-after-an-apparently-minor-injury-quickly-worsened-video

Published: February 28th, 2014 at 11:31 am ET
By ENENews

PBS NewsHour, Feb. 27, 2014: Three years after a massive earthquake and subsequent tsunami triggered meltdowns at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant, PBS NewsHour Science Correspondent Miles O’Brien returned to Japan for an update on clean-up efforts and the continuing impact of the radioactive spill. Friday, February 28:…

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Is Half Moon Bay Radioactive?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7SfV2QO71tE

There has been little to no coverage in local mainstream media about the radioactive plume from the March 2011 Fukushima nuclear disaster, that has now reached the California coastline. While some posts on popular Internet sites have dealt with this extremely important worldwide environmental crisis, they are generally very dismissive of the hazards we face (characteristically pointing to dilution of radioactive effluents, and claiming that the levels “pose no risk”, without delivering any hard facts about concentrations.) We remain blissfully unaware of any of the crucial data. How is radiation measured? What are the units? What effect does exposure to radioactive isotopes have on various body tissues? More importantly, what can we do to protect ourselves from exposure, which accumulates in our bodies over time, and which leads to cancers and other long-term disorders? Read this paper, released 3 years after the the Daiichi Power Plant in Fukushima failed. It is a tragic comedy of errors, lack of communication, and misinformation. How long will it be before we are awakened to the truth about what is already happening on our shores?

Related posts:
Fukushima Third Anniversary Events
US Sailors Copped Extremely High Levels of Radiation Near Fukushima

Related Videos:
http://youtu.be/ICgo1dpC0cc
http://youtu.be/Pz1j4IHcsP4
http://youtu.be/STSmFZeE50E
http://youtu.be/CV0GsWPE7pk

Vernon Radiation Safety

I finally found this video. It shows a man with an Inspector Geiger Counter (average cpm about 30) walking on the beach. He demonstrates how the counts are highest near to the water, with counts up to 150 cpm.   I have discussed this in a previous blog, and this is the evidence.   Experts have predicted that a plume is coming, and this is what it would look like using a Geiger Counter.   I will look for future reports, and keep you posted.

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100-tonne radioactive water leak at Fukushima nuclear plant

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Click here to read about the latest in the ongoing nuclear catastrophe at Fukushima.

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water-radiationTEPCO discovers 100-tonne radioactive water leak at Fukushima nuclear plant in Japan  ABC Radio Australia, 20 February 2014 , A new leak of 100 tonnes of highly radioactive water has been discovered at Fukushima after TEPCO revealed only one of nine thermometers in a crippled reactor was still working. A new leak of 100 tonnes of highly radioactive water has been discovered at Fukushima, the plant’s operator said after it revealed only one of nine thermometers in a crippled reactor was still working.

The tank, one of hundreds at the site that are used to store water contaminated during the process of cooling broken reactors, sits about 700 metres from the shore. A spokesman for Tokyo Electric Power says the toxic water is no longer escaping from a storage tank and is likely contained, but the news is a further blow to the company’s already-battered reputation for safety…….

The tank holds water…

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The Water Doesn’t Know

Fishermen
I wrote this poem on March 11,  2011, the day of the terrible tsunami in Japan that damaged the Daichi nuclear facility in Fukushima. Despite what we are not hearing in the media, the plant is now spewing out much more deadly radiation into the Pacific Ocean than at the time of the accident. We are all connected by the oceans. This is a global disaster, and a legacy that we are all living right now.
 

The water doesn’t know

why it has been beckoned to swell and rise,

rear up high and crash, carrying destruction in its surge,

destitution in its wake.

The uranium atoms don’t know

why they have been pressured unbearably

to split and heat and vaporize the water,

yet they split; they have no choice.

The people don’t know

why the magma of the earth sighs, groans, and shakes as if in troubled sleep

to beckon and push

the water.

Nor do the people know,

in their newfound respect for the magma and the water,

why they were once so sure that they did know

how to tame an atom

that they made wild.

The people on the other side of the ocean don’t know

that the atoms, bleeding radiation, are even now crossing the water

to visit their shores, their rivers, their drinking glasses.

Do they?

“ The World Health Organization stated that a 2013 thyroid ultrasound screening programme … found that more than a third (36%) of children in the [Fukushima] Prefecture have abnormal growths in their thyroid glands …”
(Wikipedia: Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster)

Related Posts:

Highly Radioactive Water Inside and Outside Fukushima Nuclear Reactor No 3
Breaking News: 75-Children Have Now Being Diagnosed with Thyroid Cancers

Kurosawa Saw it Coming: Fukushima Meltdown

One of the most visionary, artistically impactful filmmakers of the 20th Century, Akira Kurosawa, vividly and presciently portrayed the March 11, 2011 meltdown of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant in his 1990 film Dreams. A series of 30 short vignettes, grouped into eight “chapters” representing Kurosawa’s dreams, viscerally and accessibly bring to a point his philosophy and life wisdom, mellowed and refined throughout his 60-year filmmaking career.

Mt Fuji in Red

In the chapter “Mount Fuji in Red,” Mount Fuji begins to glow red and intensify in color and brightness in an eerie, menacing way. The edges of the mountain begin to dissolve, and six explosions are seen, coming from behind the mountain. People in the crowded countryside begin to scatter like ants, terrified. Roads are jammed with cars of people trying to flee, and the cars are abandoned on the road as their passengers take off on foot. The young male protagonist (presumably Kurosawa himself) asks if Mt. Fuji is erupting, to which a young lady accompanied by two small children replies, “It’s worse than that. Didn’t you know? The nuclear power plant has exploded.” At this point, a middle-aged business-man, consumed with worry replies, “The six atomic reactors. They’re exploding one after another. Japan is so small there’s no escape.”

The scene of utter chaos abruptly changes to a quiet, windswept seaside landscape, littered with people’s belongings; the only people left are the young man, the lady with her children, and the businessman. “Where did they escape to?” asks the young man. “To the bottom of the sea,” replies the now remorseful businessman, pointing with a gesture reminiscent of the Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come, in Dickens’s A Christmas Carol.

Then different colored clouds begin to blow across the shore. The businessman, whom we now connect with the power plant as an engineer or upper manager, names the kinds of radioactivity that the colors represent: red is Plutonium-239–one ten-millionth of a gram causes cancer; yellow is Strontium-90 which causes leukemia; purple is Cesium- 137; it affects reproduction, causing mutations and monstrosities. Even the dolphins in the ocean are doomed by the radioactivity, he reflects. He ponders a life of radioactivity-provoked disease and suffering, and concludes it is better to die right away.

The young woman poignantly cries about the injustice of the situation for her children, who have a whole life ahead of them.

“Man’s stupidity is unbelievable, ” concludes the businessman, before jumping off of the cliff into the ocean.

In the film, the accident is attributed to human error, the only real digression from the actual event. But we had Chernobyl and Three-Mile Island, and both of those disasters were caused by human error.

Kurosawa died in 1998, thirteen years before the 9.0 earthquake and tsunami hit Japan, causing 25,000 immediate deaths, meltdown of the 6-reactor Daiichi nuclear plant, and massive radioactivity pollution to the land, air, and sea that is still taking place and is reaching all waters and continents of the globe. Government officials are only now admitting that the gravity of the disaster is on a par with that of Chernobyl in 1986. The nuclear elements mentioned in Kurosawa’s film, even when “spent,” have radioactive half-lives of MILLIONS of years. While only a handful of deaths will be attributed directly to acute exposure to nuclear fuels and waste products–those who battled the meltdown in direct proximity to the nuclear reactors– the millions of painful cancer cases, birth defects, skin rashes, respiratory problems, and other serious chronic health ailments that will be passed along from generation to generation will probably never be officially counted or revealed.

The moral of the story: Listen to your visionaries, and don’t mess with nuclear energy.